Transcender :: Certification News

Get your technology and certification news here on tech trends, management moves, and tech-focused business advice to keep you on target. News sources from CompTIA Smartbrief and Certification News.



Enjoy the ride on the ever-changing channel
Source: CompTIA SmartBrief

"The channel is navigating an unprecedented time of change," says Nancy Hammervik, senior vice president of industry relation    [more]
Learn how CompTIA's Trustmarks can benefit you
Source: CompTIA SmartBrief

CompTIA Trustmarks are vendor-neutral business credentials that clearly identify IT companies following established best prac    [more]
ISACA online conference to address mobile security issues
Source: Certification Magazine

The convenience and ubiquity of wirless internet access ensures that an ever-increasing number of people have a tablet, smartphone or other personal electronic device with them just about everywhere they go. And using those tools in the performance of everyday workplace tasks has become so common that we have an acronym for it: BYOD, or Bring Your Own Device. While many employers are doubtless thrilled about potentially spending less to equip their employees, however, BYOD can have serious unintended consequences, as key enterprise data migrates to potentially unsecured personal devices. IT governance group ISACA has been preaching about the potential dangers of BYOD, with all of its attendant security loopholes, for quite some time. Now the group will be evangelizing for improved BYOD controls at a special online conference next month. Mobile Security: Overcoming Obstacles, Reducing Risk, a one-day event, will be held Sept. 17 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Eastern). The event, which is free and open to the public, will emphasize the importance of protecting proprietary information by developing security protocols to govern the use of personal devices in a workplace environment. ISACA’s international president, Robert E. Stroud, said in a press release announcing the event that it’s time for enterprises to acknowledge the risks of personal mobile devices and make plans to implement mobile security controls. “Mobile devices continue to blur work and personal lines, and securing enterprise IT has become more complex than ever in this mobile environment,” said Stroud. “Enterprises can benefit from the many conveniences employees are enjoying with BYOD, if theyRead More...The post ISACA online conference to address mobile security issues appeared first on Certification Magazine.   [more]
CSR turns down Microchip's acquisition offer
Source: CompTIA SmartBrief

CSR, which specializes in designing Bluetooth Smart chips for cars, wearable electronics and other Internet of Things applica    [more]
Study finds networking, information security on leading edge of IT
Source: Certification Magazine

There is a fair-to-decent chance that most of us don’t still have the same job title that we did in 1999, whether that title was sales manager or burger flipper. Especially in the realm of IT — where advances in technology open up new areas of specialization with a regularity approaching that more typically attributed to the rising and setting of the sun — there’s always something new and different just around the corner. Even taking that into account, however, you may be surprised to learn what some of us didn’t do, at least not in name, just 15 years ago. A recent study by the Pew Research Center reveals that IT networking, for example, despite being hugely common in 2014, was still in its infancy just before the turn of the millennium. Today, more than 165,000 Americans are computer network specialists, and more than 141,000 are computer network architects. In 1999, however, neither specialization existed. Ditto for information security analysts, of which there are more than 78,000 today. There were also no web developers in 1999, or at least not who worked under than name., Today, that profession is claimed today by more than 112,000 IT pros. Some of the work that falls under those specializations was still being done 15 years ago, of course — we just didn’t have nearly as many people doing it. Many technologists submit that there won’t be as many people doing it in the future, either, as machines and computerization push human workers further and further out of the loop.Read More...The post Study finds networking, information security on leading edge of IT appeared first on Certification Magazine.   [more]
IT training certification: A look at instructor credibility
Source: Certification Magazine

One of the certifications that keeps popping up on lists of either valuable or growing IT training certifications is that of the CompTIA CTT+. This is far from the only trainer certification that exists, but I am honing in on it simply because 10% of the Essentials exam (TK0-201) that everyone must pass is focused on “Instructor Credibility and Communications.” As an experiment, I wanted to see if the age of the student factors into instructor credibility, and decided to measure it based on persuadability. This article details the findings of that study. Background The Anderson University Masters of Business Administration (MBA) program is offered in two formats: Professional and Residential. The “professional” program is a 22 month program designed for working professionals. These non-traditional students attend classes one night a week at various locations in the Indianapolis area, being part of a cohort of 10-to-12 other professionals. The “residential” program is for more traditional students, who have recently completed their undergraduate education and want to transition immediately into their graduate studies. Viewed as a single cohort, these students stay in university housing and are able to complete the MBA in one year. While both groups of students are progressing through the same content, research has shown that “the differences between traditional and nontraditional students support the fact that students cannot be considered one homogenous group” (Wooten, 1998). The most striking difference between the two groups in this experiment is age — the residential students are substantially younger than theRead More...The post IT training certification: A look at instructor credibility appeared first on Certification Magazine.   [more]
Latest Salary Survey PLUS captures info about Cisco certifications
Source: Certification Magazine

Probably the foremost IT networking firm in the world, Cisco Systems, Inc., has been a leader in the IT landscape for decades. In addition to being a leading developer of networking products and technology, Cisco is also one of the premier entities in the realm of IT education and training — Cisco certifications are a bedrock layer in many high school and college IT programs.  And through its Cisco Learning Network and Cisco Networking Academy brands, the company provides training and education to IT professionals around the world. For these and other reasons, Cisco was a natural fit for the latest quarterly issue of Certification Magazine, which has an IT networking theme. We harvested quite a bit of data from our recent Salary Survey PLUS, which featured Cisco certifications, most of which is available in the print magazine. On the other hand, we enjoy a good infographic as much as the next bunch of tech evangelizers, and this seemed like it would be a fitting and engaging way to present a sneak preview of our findings.The post Latest Salary Survey PLUS captures info about Cisco certifications appeared first on Certification Magazine.   [more]
Firms, universities to collaborate on secure-software guidelines
Source: CompTIA SmartBrief

Google, Twitter, Harvard University and others are part of a 13 company-university project, the IEEE Computer Society Center     [more]
Microsoft Certified Professionals have mixed view of certification
Source: Certification Magazine

Here’s a non-IT tidbit that you probably didn’t know: The Carnation food brand originally famed for its evaporated milk from “contented cows,” was founded in 1899 in Washington state, in the same general vicinity where Microsoft now has its world headquarters. In a related vein, the most recent annual survey of Microsoft Certified Professionals revealed that many folks with Microsoft credentials are generally satisfied with their Microsoft certifications, but found some nits to pick regarding the program that produces them. You might say that those chosen (at random) for the survey are not entirely contended certified professionals. The results of the survey are not public, but Microsoft Learning blogger Liberty Munson divulged some of its findings on Wednesday, and while some of the feedback was apparently quite positive, participants in the survey also aired some beefs. Reflecting a fairly common view of certification in general, many of those surveyed feel that the value of a given certification is driven most by its ability to increase opportunities for employment. Within that realm, on the other hand, MCPs are apparently more likely to value a certification if it provides them with problem-solving skills. As Munson sees it, that puts the onus on Microsoft Learning to gear its exams toward real-world challenges and solutions. On the positive side, survey respondents report that Microsoft certs do actually impact hiring decisions. Not only that, but the view of Microsoft Certified Professionals is that the perceived impact of a Microsoft cert in making a determination between job candidates has increased substantially in the pastRead More...The post Microsoft Certified Professionals have mixed view of certification appeared first on Certification Magazine.   [more]
SAP's bid for patent on "foldable" mobile device is revealed
Source: CompTIA SmartBrief

SAP has applied for a patent on a "foldable information worker mobile device" that could function as a cellphone, laptop, sma    [more]
SmartBrief will not publish Monday
Source: CompTIA SmartBrief

In observance of Labor Day in the U.S., SmartBrief will not publish Monday. Publication will resume Tuesday.    [more]
Three tech firms crowned Best of ChannelCon winners by CompTIA
Source: Certification Magazine

IT industry association CompTIA has unveiled the Big Three from its recently concluded ChannelCon event, held in Phoenix earlier this month. Best of ChannelCon recognition, as determined via voting by ChannelCon attendees, was bestowed a trio of prestigious tech firms: computer-making titan Dell (Best Hardware), business cloud provider Intermedia (Best Services), and data management group StorageCraft (Best Software). It was an especially auspicious ChannelCon for StorageCraft, which also claimed an overall Best of Show recognition. CompTIA exec Nancy Hammervik said in a press release announcing the awards that making a splash at ChannelCon is no small feat. “The Best of ChannelCon awards carry added significance because the winners are selected by their industry partners and peers,” Hammervik said. StorageCraft, based in Draper, Utah, adjoining Utah’s tech-heavy “Silicon Slopes” region, was founded in 2003. The company develops and distributes top-caliber data management tools, providing software solutions for data protection, data backup, disaster recovery, system migration and virtualization. Storagecraft technologies are designed to be implemented at all levels of data storage, ranging from servers to laptops. Intermedia, which shares its name (but not its corporate DNA) with the Hollywood production companies behind such films as Adaptation, The Aviator, Basic Instinct 2 and Terminator Salvation, was founded in 1995 and has corporate headquarters in Mountain View, Calif., in the heart of Silicon Valley. Intermedia provides cloud services to “small and medium-sized businesses,” with 60,000 customers worldwide.     In addition to its Best Services win, Intermedia claimed victory in the ChannelCon 2014 RecruitmentRead More...The post Three tech firms crowned Best of ChannelCon winners by CompTIA appeared first on Certification Magazine.   [more]
Report: New iPhones will have NXP's NFC chips
Source: CompTIA SmartBrief

Next-generation iPhone models expected to be introduced next month will include near-field communication chips supplied by NX    [more]
Palo Alto adds incentives, marketing to channel program
Source: CompTIA SmartBrief

Cybersecurity company Palo Alto Networks says it's adding to its NextWave channel partner platform to include market-based pr    [more]
Low-cost BSD certification could give your IT resume a boost
Source: Certification Magazine

As many personal computer users have learned over the years — some perhaps more frequently than others — few user experiences are more frustrating than seeing your work get “blue screened.” The operating system chokes on something and the computer more or less literally tells you, “Oops.” It’s potentially far more damaging to have the OS crap out when it’s managing a website server for a major corporation, so commercial ventures typically rely on more stable operating systems, such as Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Or, in the case of some of the largest entities on the web, including Yahoo!, a somewhat obscure OS warhorse with the initials BSD. The acronym is uncannily similar to BSOD, which stands for “blue screen of doom (or death),” as referenced above. Berkeley Software Distribution, on the other hand, is a Unix-based OS so legendarily stable that its “uptimes” (the operating interval since the last system reboot) are sometimes measured in years. Developed from 1977 to 1995 at the University of California, Berkeley, BSD today is available in a variety of releases, much like Linux. Also like Linux, most BSD-derived operating systems are open source and generally distributed free of charge. Some of the more popular variations are FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD and DragonflyBSD. Just as there are a variety of certifications for Linux, OpenStack and other open source software, you can get BSD certified, too. The BSD Certification Group offers two levels of certification. You can become a BDS Certified Associate (BSDA), or a BSD Certified Professional (BSDP), though requirements to achieve the latter designation areRead More...The post Low-cost BSD certification could give your IT resume a boost appeared first on Certification Magazine.   [more]


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