Transcender :: Certification News

Get your technology and certification news here on tech trends, management moves, and tech-focused business advice to keep you on target. News sources from CompTIA Smartbrief and Certification News.



Is experience the most important arrow in your IT quiver?
Source: Certification Magazine

It is tempting to state that job experience is universally acknowledged as the single most important factor when evaluating a candidate for a position as an Oracle Database Administrator. The universe is a really big place, however, and there is an exception to every rule. In 20 years of working with the Oracle database, I have never met that exception. Neither do I have any suggestion what criteria someone might put forward as being more important than job experience. Companies that make use of Oracle for their database generally use it to store information that is absolutely critical to their business processes. When hiring employees to administer their enterprise database, it follows that they are extremely reluctant to hire someone who has not done the job in a production environment for several years. Very few job listings for Oracle Database Administrators specify fewer than three to five years of experience as a requirement. This leads to something of a chicken and egg problem, of course. Because companies prefer to hire experienced database administrators, it is often difficult for people to get their first few years working as a DBA. Some administrators begin their careers as an Oracle developer or another position where they work closely with the database and move towards administration over time. Others are hired as an assistant to a senior DBA, or to administer non-production databases. Five years spent working as a DBA is one of the more common milestones. It would be impossible to count theRead More...The post Is experience the most important arrow in your IT quiver? appeared first on Certification Magazine.   [more]
Tech interns are a hot commodity among IT companies
Source: CompTIA SmartBrief

Technology companies, including Facebook and LinkedIn, are grabbing up young students, from middle school to college levels,     [more]
IBM to invest in chip research, new computing tech
Source: CompTIA SmartBrief

IBM will invest $3 billion into research for shrinking semiconductors down to 7 nanometers and to explore new technologies su    [more]
On the ground with TestOut Conference 2014
Source: Certification Magazine

If you’ve had your eye on the Certification Magazine Twitter feed this week, then it won’t surprise you to hear that our team recently attended the fourth annual TestOut Conference, held this year at Solitude Mountain Resort, nestled amid the heavily forested summits east of Salt Lake City, Utah. TestOut is a global certification company that markets simulation-based certification training software, as well as sponsoring its own certification program. TestOut’s Pro series of certs includes the likes of PC Pro, Network Pro, Security Pro and more. The conference welcomed attendees at an evening mixer on Tuesday before getting down to the serious business of discussing certification Wednesday morning. Developer Don Whitnah opened the day’s presentations by previewing TestOut’s upcoming product releases, including a long-in-the-works HTML5 overhaul. What Whitnah really wanted to talk about, however, is a problem that makes key personnel at every IT company in America lie awake at night. “Over the next 12 months,” Whitnah said, “TestOut will have to update every product we sell.” Gone are the days of releasing a product that stays on the market for three to five years, or even two to three years. Whitnah pointed out that the most recent major upgrade to Google’s popular Chrome web browser was released … June 10. The challenge for TestOut and other certification providers is to keep existing products current, while still finding the time to explore new ideas. The next presenter was one of our own, Certification Magazine executive editor Rocky Steele, who told the crowdRead More...The post On the ground with TestOut Conference 2014 appeared first on Certification Magazine.   [more]
W3C aims for full recommendation of HTML5 by year’s end
Source: Certification Magazine

Gradually, imperceptibly, beneath your very fingers on the keyboard, the internet is becoming something different. Many users may never even notice the change, especially since it’s not intended to effect what you see so much as what goes on beneath the surface that lets you see it. Since 1997, the internet has hummed along on the fourth iteration of HTML, or HyperText Markup Language, the markup language that tells your browser how to display the contents of a webpage. Now HTML 4 (properly written with a space, apparently) is on the way out, and HTML5 (no space; see how advancing technology changes everything?) could be just a few months away from being given full clearance by the World Wide Web Consortium, the primary international standards organization for the internet. HTML5 has been on the fast track, so to speak, since 2012, when the consortium, more commonly known as W3C, advanced it to Candidate Recommentdation status and announced a plan to complete further testing and approval processes by the end of 2014. On June 17, W3C official Philippe Le Hégaret reaffirmed those intentions in an informal blog post and said that HTML5 has performed well across 97,000 tests, with just 3.3 percent of tests revealing failures. HTML5 is now in the Last Call phase of Candidate Recommendation, with W3C officials accepting comments until July 15 about changes implemented during Candidate Recommendation. The group plans to address those concerns by early fall, which will advance HTML5 to Proposed Recommendation, that final status beforeRead More...The post W3C aims for full recommendation of HTML5 by year’s end appeared first on Certification Magazine.   [more]
TechAmerica announces SMAC Chicago
Source: CompTIA SmartBrief

The TechAmerica Foundation is hosting SMAC Chicago, a half-day forum that examines the intersection between social media, mob    [more]
There is virtually no excuse to lack hands-on experience
Source: Certification Magazine

For the past 15 years or so, I have had a problem with operating systems. My primary computer is always running a recent version of Microsoft Windows. It is the OS that is invariably the one available in the offices where I work. I often have a project, however, that requires some other operating system. This might be an older version of Windows, which I need in order to run older software that will not run under the current release. Every once in a while, I have a need for an MS-DOS machine — which requires some really old software. And over the last decade or so, I have often needed a computer running Linux in order to perform some Oracle testing. I have used numerous methods to satisfy this requirement over the years. The simplest was just using an old computer that I had upgraded from. This meant a hassle finding space to store a second PC, however, as well as dealing with multiple monitors, keyboards, power cords and network cables. On other occasions, I have used a single computer that could boot to multiple operating systems. This has been done variously through a boot drive with removable media; a PC with multiple hard drives swapped via BIOS changes; or operating systems that make use of boot loaders. On the other hand, whatever the method used to dual-boot a computer, it results in a system that is either in your primary OS or not. When the system is bootedRead More...The post There is virtually no excuse to lack hands-on experience appeared first on Certification Magazine.   [more]
Dear CertMag: My phone support job is holding me back
Source: Certification Magazine

Dear CertMag: My parents have a mom-and-pop computer repair service where I worked for years before college. I picked up a lot of what I know from them, and added to it in high school and college. I just took my first job post-graduation doing phone support for a software company. It pays quite well, actually, but I feel like I knew everything about everything by the end of the first day. My employer likes to promote from within, and there’s a development team, programming team, etc. What’s the best way to get noticed and move up to something more interesting? — Larry, Boise, Idaho CertMag responds: One of the challenges that many technology oriented companies are facing right now is the passion that many technologists — like you and me — are bringing to the office. Sometimes, this passion can be a critically important source of entrepreneurship, innovation and productivity. Unfortunately, it can also create friction in interpersonal relationships, and in the management effort to build and lead cohesive teams and units. Having seen this for myself — and if we are being honest, at times in my career having been a source of this kind of challenge — my first suggestion would be to focus on excellence in the capacity that you have to perform today. Much like building any kind of great thing, without a solid foundation to start expanding your sphere of influence and continue your professional growth, the push forward is not likely to takeRead More...The post Dear CertMag: My phone support job is holding me back appeared first on Certification Magazine.   [more]
Experts say hybrid cloud is necessary progression of IT
Source: CompTIA SmartBrief

Analysts say there is increasing demand for hybrid cloud services.     [more]
Teens polish cert smarts by competing in SkillsUSA
Source: Certification Magazine

Whether it’s marching band, or debate squad, or cheerleading camp, or varsity athletics, kids in high school like to compete. Sure, it looks good on college applications, and parents and teachers like to encourage students to excel. For those who really catch the vision, however, for the ones who stay the course and take daylong bus rides to neighboring states, there’s probably a much simpler explanation. Competition is fun. That’s what’s at the heart of the SkillsUSA Championships this week in Kansas City, Mo. Teens from across the country have gathered to show their stuff in just about every realm of learning you can imagine. At the first SkillsUSA Championships in 1967, 54 students went toe-to-toe in three different competitions. In 2014, there are more than 6,000 participants squaring off in 99 competitive categories. As a high school freshman, Ryan Higgins decided to jump into the SkillsUSA technology competitions for computer applications and computer maintenance. He stayed after school for weeks to study and prepare, taking practice test after practice test. “We had 80 kids competing from our school,” Higgins said. “We drove up to the Garden State Exhibit Center. We were up until 1 a.m. in the morning, practicing, quizzing each other.” The next day brought a six-hour competition. “There were a bunch of computers and they all had issues, and we had to figure out what was wrong with them,” Higgins said. “I thought, ‘This is fun, this is cool, I got to meet lots of cool people.’Read More...The post Teens polish cert smarts by competing in SkillsUSA appeared first on Certification Magazine.   [more]
Microsoft touts savings via the cloud
Source: CompTIA SmartBrief

Microsoft says its upcoming cloud-storage appliances and backup service could save users 60%.    [more]
Press Pass: Go for the gold and other certification news
Source: Certification Magazine

Welcome to the latest installment of  Press Pass , where CertMag reports new and recent certification news by blowing through as many industry press releases, blogs, dispatches, messages in a bottle, etc., as we can fit in one post. We’ve got the highlights and you can click straight to the horse’s mouth for more information. You’re the best around: Everyone who applies for the open position of IT security manager at ABC Corporation probably has a certification or two. How many of them, on the other hand, could show off a gold medal? Some people think they’re awesome, and some people say out loud that they’re awesome, but a gold medal proves that you’re awesome. That’s why IT security pros should think seriously about competing in the Global CyberLympics, sponsored by EC-Council Foundation, an industry group that promotes cybersecurity education and training. The CyberLympics is a worldwide online competition that challenges teams of four to six cybersecurity professionals to test their mettle in a variety of challenges. EC-Council senior director Eric Lopez issued a call for competitors via the ISACA Now blog on Monday, and registration is open through July 31. More than 3,000 competitors from 72 countries participated in the 2013 event, so beating the field is no small accomplishment. Get your head in the cloud: As personal and business computing increasingly moves away from our laptops and desktops, cloud computing companies are scouring the IT employment sector in search of talented, shall we say, rainmakers. Certification providers are scrambling toRead More...The post Press Pass: Go for the gold and other certification news appeared first on Certification Magazine.   [more]
Analysts: PC shipments stabilized in Q2
Source: CompTIA SmartBrief

The PC-manufacturing market stabilized in the second quarter after a two-year decline in shipments, analysts say.     [more]
Whiz kid: Going straight from high school to IT security
Source: Certification Magazine

This feature first appeared in the Spring 2014 issue of Certification Magazine. Among the skills sought for work in penetration testing — the branch of cybersecurity in which gifted “ethical hackers” attempt to strengthen network or website security by finding and exploiting weaknesses — are excellence in programming, deep familiarity with operating systems, knowledge of computer forensics, and solid understanding of networking and network protocols. Considerably lower on the list than any of those: ability to optimize communication using image, type and spacing. Graphic design has its place, but one thing it probably won’t get you is the River Phoenix-in-Sneakers Memorial Tech Whiz slot on a penetration testing team. So it’s a little unusual for Seth Elo to have ended up where he has, with a IT security career firmly in his sights. In the beginning, before enrolling at Summit Technology Academy in Lee’s Summit, Mo., the only thing Elo wanted to attack was the branch of computer wizardry that gets practitioners hired to create a bold new look for a website, brochure, book jacket, ad campaign, etc. “I got into IT certification by mistake,” Elo said. “I wanted to be a graphic designer.” After hearing about a “computer” class at Summit Technology Academy, Elo assumed he could pick up some advanced graphic design skills there and signed up. “The first day of class, I realized my mistake,” Elo said, “but my schedule was set so I decided to stick with it.” After being in class for only a matter ofRead More...The post Whiz kid: Going straight from high school to IT security appeared first on Certification Magazine.   [more]


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